For exhibit and event professionals  

Dilemma: Daylight saving time never saves me

February 28, 2011 By Editor

Whether it’s summer, winter or any other season, the days seem too short for me to handle all the details connected with exhibit management and being a strategic marketer. No doubt, many managers and supervisors deal with this challenge. How have you overcome the “I can’t get everything done” syndrome?

— Rochelle, Exhibits Manager

Make the hours work for you

Rochelle, since you can’t add any hours to the day, our readers suggest you:

  • Get organized.
  • Get real.
  • Get together with your boss.

Get organized

Right now, when you look at what you have to do each day, all you see is this huge mountain of things you need to conquer. And that can be daunting unless you manage your steps.

An events coordinator understands where you’re coming from and believes organization is the answer.

“PRIORITIZE! Each day, write yourself a list of tasks that must be done immediately and number them in order of importance. Complete the urgent tasks ASAP and put off what you cannot complete (that day) until tomorrow. Renumber your priorities the next day because the urgency of ‘task completion’ may change. You may surprise yourself with how much you can accomplish when you know you’re in control.

“Staying organized and facing problems head-on (in order of urgency) helps alleviate stress and makes you feel successful. Remember, all tasks can be broken down into smaller steps that are more achievable. Take one task at a time, and as you complete each one, you’ll see your stress decrease and your mood lighten. Good luck and keep plugging along one task/accomplishment at a time.”

Get real

Maybe instead of stressing out over the big stuff, you should concentrate on the one thing that’s really causing your headache.

Deborah R. Herr, marketing strategist/writer, explains how to cut your anxiety down to size.

“Make a list, and look it over carefully. I’ll bet you find that one item is a ‘stopper.’ It’s keeping you from doing anything else because it’s sucking up thinking time and emotional energy. Maybe you’ve been putting it off? Do that one item, and it will open up the rest of your list to be accomplished more easily.”

Get together with your boss

On the other hand, the fact you’re always on the go at work may not have anything to do with your abilities or organizational skills. It could be a management problem, which you should discuss with your boss.

A PR manager speaks of the underlying problem that may be responsible for the problems you face.

“This seems to be a chronic issue, more now than ever before. Unfortunately, in my career, I’ve seen way too many company executives who don’t recognize that this department or that is understaffed.

“If you feel like this is what’s happening in your situation, there’s no shame in having a heart-to-heart with your boss to explain why you could use some help. But don’t ask for the moon and stars. Suggest getting an intern or a part timer. Either is a low-cost alternative for your company to prevent you from getting so burned out or so stressed out that you leave your current position and take all your valuable experience with you.”

Rochelle, create a daily to-do list, look for that one task that keeps you from going forward and handle it first, or talk to your boss about your concerns. But don’t run yourself ragged and then stress over what you haven’t accomplished!


  • In the events and exhibits world, many professionals feel the same way as Rochelle. Busy at work, busy at home, they seem to be constantly on the move, trying to get everything done. And when it isn’t, the stress levels begin to rise.

    Don’t give into the pressure. Organization will help. But most of all, I think Rochelle should give herself a break. She can only do what she can do.

    What does anyone else think?

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